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What You Need to Know About Powers of Attorney (POA)

A Power of Attorney (POA) document is an essential part of your estate planning. All states recognize powers of attorney, but rules and requirements will differ from state to state. The document gives one or more individuals the legal authority…

Maximize Harmony Among Heirs by Structuring Your Estate Plan

Your children, including minors and adults, may not agree about your family circumstances, including who should inherit your estate. Relationships can change and intensify when you die, with underlying issues that bubble to the surface, creating tensions over your estate…

Talk to Your Aging Parents About Finances and Estate Planning

It is essential that as your parents’ age, you have conversations with them about their finances. To broach the topic, you might bring up current events like the coronavirus pandemic, its effect on economic conditions, and how it relates to…

Regular Reviews Keep Your Estate Plan Current

Reviewing your estate planning documents on a regular basis help to make sure they’re still good, especially with big life changes like births, marriages, divorces, and moving to another state. Children grow up, marriages dissolve, property gets sold, residences change.…

The Need for a Living Will

In order to legally lay out your life-sustaining medical preferences, you must have a living will.  It is often accompanied by a health-care proxy or power of attorney, which allows someone to make treatment decisions for you if you are…

Medicaid, Gift-Giving, and Costly Consequences

If a loved one may need Medicaid assistance in the near future, it is important for that person to abstain from giving gifts. While this can be especially hard for people who get joy out of generosity, gifts in this…

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